Creative Drinking

 

It’s Sunday afternoon and I am pleased to announce that we have recorded one of the final elements to our inaugural podcast launch, “YAY!” All that is left is some final editing to be sure we don’t sound like a bunch of old men droning on about nothing while thinking we are as clever as the sun is bright. We are a hopeful bunch, and I think you may like what is in store for your listening pleasure.

So after an afternoon of recording and good company, I went home and logged on to my interweb machine looking for ideas, stories, and potential OverServed information you might need to hear. I searched my usual suspects, but it was bigthink.com that came through for me again. Just the other day I was having a conversation with a friend about the “creative process” and how the search for a brilliant writer begins with a fine bottle of whiskey. I can honestly say that I have made some valiant attempts at unlocking my creative brain with a double Jameson on the rocks, and sometimes it worked and I wrote some really funny shit. Sometimes I thought getting naked and dancing to Brittany Spears was my greatest artistic expression, and I demanded respect for my moves. Perhaps the term “liquid courage” is less about the fearlessness created by a booze soaked gummy bear you just ate, and more about the freedom to be creative and inspire you to write the next great American novel … Too far? I thought so too – the following pieces just touch upon the surface of how our creative brains are affected by drinking, but what I like most, as an artist myself, is I finally have a little bit of validation!

 “Similar results have been found with alcohol, i.e. that intoxicated people can solve creative problems better than sober ones. The moral of the story is that concentration does not come without its down side. While an alert and sober person may solve an algebra equation faster, their singular focus keeps them from considering information not directly relevant to a problem, missing out on creative solutions.”

The following includes a three and a half minute video that reminds me that I was born in the wrong decade 🙂

“A lot of the great writers when I was a kid the names like William Faulkner was a big drinker, and a F. Scott Fitzgerald who was one of my favorite writers when I was a young man and reading fiction for the first time was a notorious drinking and his wife. There was a celebration of alcoholism almost within the creative arts and also even in journalism.”